Episode – 14

Larry Namer - Media Entrepreneur, International Business Tycoon, Master Dealmaker

Description

Larry Namer is the President and CEO of Metan and COO of Fanvestor. Along with Alan Mruvka, he founded E! Entertainment Television and Movies USA Magazine. They eventually sold their stake in E!, which is now owned by Comcast.

Larry is a recognized expert in the business of international media and entertainment. After E! he started Comspan Communications which promoted or produced several hundred rock concerts in Russia. They also brought the Harlem Globetrotters to Russia in 1995 for the first time in almost 50 years. As CEO of Metan he helped create a series called Hello! Hollywood!, a weekly entertainment news series tailored to Chinese audiences, offering up the latest in celebrity, pop culture and lifestyle news.


What You Will Learn
- How to deal with business failures and setbacks
- How to get ready for the deal table
- Deal breakers and how to avoid them


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Full Transcript

JP Maroney:

Greetings and welcome to this episode of the deal flow show. I'm JP Maroney, your host, along with my cohost, mr. Paul Nicoline here at Harbor city capital have a great guest. And I was reading over your bio. Larry, I'm excited about diving into your background and some of the things that you're working on right now, but we have Larry namer with us. He is the founder of E entertainment group. A lot of people would be obviously familiar with that in the consumer market. He also is the COO of fan Vester, which I am excited to learn more about. I just took a little bit of a peek at the business model, but really excited to learn about that as well as president of may ton. And we'll talk about all the deals you've got on the table. So I was looking at your bio and it was one of the things I pointed out to Daniel Penn Orenda, our producer for this show.

Who's also in our business development group at Harbor city. And I said, it looks like you've done a lot with taking existing assets, uh, entertainment assets from the U S re-purposing and repositioning them overseas, which is very interesting from a deal-making perspective. So I want to get into that a little bit today and talk about that. Also want to talk a little bit about the Harlem globe Trotters as I hear that in the sound of their music in the back of my mind that you took them over into Russia, I believe for the first time in 50 years. Uh, and so we're going to talk about a lot of exciting things, but maybe you could back up just a little bit. You created E entertainment group and with a partner, I believe in a fairly modest amount of capital and the company is now valued. I know y'all exited, but the company is now valued greatly and obviously has impacted a lot of lives. Can you kind of talk a little bit about that start and the early days of what y'all did there and then let's bring it forward to today?

Larry Namer: 

Sure. Um, myself and a friend of mine named Alan morose gut, Al's a friend from New Jersey that, uh, was actually in the real estate business, but, uh, one of the real estate deals he got involved in was taking over a small little studio here in LA. And you know, when your New York kids and you'd come out to LA, you get the bug and you want to be in the entertainment business like everybody else. So I had been in the cable business since high school, but more on the, uh, uh, the technical and the operations end. I actually started as a, uh, an underground splicer in Manhattan, uh, when I first got out of school, cause I couldn't find a real job. Um, and then I kind of grew with it. But, uh, well, when I came out to California, I came out to be the vice president general manager of a company called Valley cable, which was the first 61 channel two-way cable system ever built in the U S and you know, back then, you know, we're talking 1981.

Um, there weren't a heck of a lot of channels out there. So while I had the capacity for 61 that were in 61 that existed, so I called up the studios and said, Hey, you know, I see movie trailers only when I'm in the movies. Why don't you show them to me when I'm in my house? So make me want to go to the movies. And they said, well, we really can't afford it. And whatever I say, great, send me the movie trolls. I'll put them on a channel. And then we'll, uh, you know, you'll invite me to all those parties and premiers, uh, and they were more than happy to do that more. We did, um, kind of audience surveys. What's your favorite channel? They go, I love MTV. I love ESPN. I love that trail with the channel. And when the company that I worked for moved back to Canada, I said, you know, I didn't go from New York to LA to go to Canada.

Um, so I, I kept thinking about that saying, you know, I get the best two minutes of a $15 million movie for free. And a lot of ways, it's just like at PB, you know, where a host would turn to a green screen and saying, Madonna has a new video. I said, well, why can't I just have someone turned to the green screening age Watson as a new TV show or a movie. And so then Alan and I just kept kicking that around. You know, we're going to be entertainment tonight, 24 hours a day, MTV at the movies. And we wrote a business plan and we thought it was logical. Everybody we met with said, this is a great idea, but you know, you're not time Warner or you're not TCI. And, you know, wake up in the morning and start TV networks. That's not the way the business works.

And Alan, I just weren't smart enough to listen to them. So we just kept going. And at that time, the going rate to get a TV network on was somewhere between Oh 60 and a hundred million dollars. And I'm finally after three and a half years, and we were, we were almost ready to give up. Um, we, we met a investment banker on wall street and he said, I love this and I want to fund it. And we said, yay. When can we get to 60 million? And he said, well, I'm only allowed to sign for two and a half. Um, you know, we go, Oh, well, what are we going to do with two and a half? And then we thought about, it said, you know what, we'll figure this out. So we took the two and a half million and, um, I called the friend and, uh, university of Texas in Austin and asked him if he had kids in the radio TV program that, uh, needed intern jobs. So he literally sent us 31 intern. And so we started the company with 11 employees and 31 interns. That is

JP Maroney: 

Cool. Okay. So to my original point, though, IE entertainment, the original channel was repurposing movie trailers. This is a theme in your life. Where did, can you identify a point back early at? So, I mean, I know you started out, as you said, with the Spicer cable split bikes or whatever, but can you, at some point in your life, was there something that clicked that connected the dot for you of taking one thing and finding a place for it? Because that is, I see that theme obviously through everything and you just named another one.

Larry Namer:

Um, well, you know, it really didn't start till I got to Valley cable and, you know, it was just at the time that, um, cable TV was really beginning to blow up and expand and stuff. And, and I, I marveled at MTV, you know, which was this when it started, it was just this incredible phenomenon. And I said, that business model is amazing. They're getting the best musicians in the world to do music for them. And they're, they're getting that, you know, that, that two and $3 million music video for free, and they're standing a host in front of a green screen and, you know, paying the host, you know, a thousand bucks a week to do it. I said, you know, I love that model. And, and, you know, just at that time, you know, you have the cable channel explosion. And, um, uh, the, the phrase that I kept hearing bandied around was cable TV is like an electronic newspaper and LLI.

We thought about it and go, you know what, it's a CNN is the headline. ESPN is the sports. The home shopping network is the, is the ads we said, but the thing that's missing from that picture is the second most read section of any newspaper. And that's the entertainment pages. So we, that's what we set out to be the entertainment pages of the cable newspaper. Um, you know, because we knew people would love it. And we actually thought more of it because it was international. People's love of Hollywood and stars and gossip and stuff was not just restricted to us. The way a lot of cable networks were restricted to us, but we figured we had something international. And we, we knew that we could do it economically because we were going to get, you know, clips from movies from free. And then, you know, after we got started, I would go to the studios and say, listen, you know, why don't you send a video crew on the set while you're making the movie and I'll promote it six months before it comes out instead of a week before it comes out and they were thrilled to do it.

So we were getting all of this incredible video content literally for free. Um, and you know, that, that gave us the basis for being able to start small. And then once we established, um, you know, it just, it was one of those overnight successes that took three and a half years to cultivate itself. Um, but we, you know, we started getting advertising money and then we said, okay, now we have a little bit of money. We could get a little more creative with the programming. So we started with things like talk soup and Howard stern and new Hollywood choose story. And I, you know, so we just built on it and basically was built on internal cashflow,

JP Maroney:

All exited, right. And, and had that liquidity event walk us through because there are a lot of deal makers that watch this show, listen to this show who are looking to their first exit. So that's on there, that's the goal for them as y'all built towards that. And I know you said something very, um, unbelief, and you said that, you know, you were too dumb to know better than to keep going or whatever. Um, and as entrepreneurs, I know we're bullheaded. A lot of times we just keep pushing, but, and sometimes we prove other people wrong, but when you got close to that, and as you were coming up on that exit, walk us through the process as y'all were, we're putting the deal together and ultimately making, making the exit and having the liquidity,

Larry Namer:

Uh, you know, once we got on the air, you know, the old, the cable industry, the big cable companies, that timing, and then move, which we can find more on TCI, United cable. And, you know, a lot of those companies won't merge together and they don't, they don't exist anymore, but, um, they came to us and said, Hey, you know, now that we really can understand what you're doing, uh, we'd like to invest in you. So we took in seven of the biggest cable operators as, as investors in the company. And we grew astronomically the first year, we were in 14 other countries, other than us, we were the fastest growing cable system in the U S and it just, you know, it, it got so big, so fast that, you know, for me personally, um, who's a creative person, you know, at the end of the day, um, found myself, spending more time reading financial statements and sitting in boardrooms and fighting over next year's budgets and ad sales, projections and stuff.

So, you know, after a while it just stopped, you know, you know, in year nine or something, it just got old for me. Um, so I just decided, you know, I didn't want to participate in the day to day. And so I just went on the board and I hired a C CEO to kind of run the day to day. And, um, and so, and then we just, we just sat there with the one thing we did, which was really smart, um, was when we negotiated those deals, um, we negotiated dilution protection, uh, for Alan and I. So even though HBO and time Warner kept, Oh, we could run the day to day so much more efficiently than Larry ever did. You know, they spent another $75 million over budget building it now. And I just sat and wept, you know, we go, this is great. Keep pouring that money into the company. And they did. So, uh, it was, you know, we, we were fortunate stopping, you know, at that time, the cable companies knew that growth was inevitable. So they really didn't care about throwing an extra 75 million into operating. Talk a little bit

JP Maroney:

About what's going on with Matan now. Um, I know you've got that. You also have a fan Vestor, which we're going to talk about, but I want to talk a little bit about may and just a moment before we do, if you're listening or watching this episode of the deal flow show, you can go to the deal flow, show.com and get access to our archives as well as a subscriber, follow us for future episodes as well. That's the deal flow show.com. All right, Larry. So talk a little bit about what you're doing today with Matan and the interest it could be. You can talk about us globally. Um, I read a lot about where you've, again, taken shows overseas repurposed content. It's very interesting,

Larry Namer:

You know, w while I was still at E I'm, a lawyer friend of mine in town asked me if I would go over to Russia with some clients or peers that were basically a merchant banking, and somebody proposed an entertainment deal to them. And, uh, the lawyer wasn't sure how real it was. So he asked me, could you go there and tell me what you think? And no, I just thought it was fascinating to go to Russia, you know? And, uh, so I didn't, of course the deal that they were looking at was not really a good deal. And so they ultimately passed on that, but, um, I really liked the place and I liked the people and I could tell the changes were coming. And, um, so I had met the mayor of st. Petersburg, uh, and, you know, he asked me if I would help them start a charity to raise money for the children's hospital and the children's orphanage there and via doing a music festival.

And, you know, my first reaction was, well, you know, I would love to help you, but I don't know the music business. And he goes, well, you gotta know more than I do. And I went, all right, I'll give you that one. And, uh, so I set out to start, what's called the white Knights crash, the wall, uh, which is now in its 30th year, um, now. And, uh, it was a charity, but to get, uh, to get people to play, um, I would kind of promise them, you know, unusual venues, unusual experiences and stuff like that. And then I'd go to the mayor and say, listen, I had a problem as David Bowie, he could dance on the graves of the zines, uh, and the mayor would go, yay. I just go see Vladimir. And, you know, it turns out Bladimir the vice mayor.

His last name was Bruton. Um, so, you know, as, as his fortunes Rose, um, he ended up in the Kremlin and he made a friend of mine, um, the minister communications, and they realized that they had to, um, they had a kind of, we think media regulation, they have, so that if they're going to have a consumer economy, you got to bring in goods that people actually want to buy. Um, so that means you're going to bring in Western goods. Western market is, and they're going to be used to certain things existing, like advertising on TV is 30 seconds. Not whatever you feel like today, or if you know the right guy in the communist party, you can have T instead of putting the ads on. And yeah, it was kind of Willy nilly. You know, people did whatever they wanted. Um, but so I had helped them do that.

And then, um, about 11 years ago, the Chinese government, how to realize they also have the media reform, if you're going to build this consumer economy. Yeah. Because they wanted Coke and Pepsi and, you know, all the usual PNG and the usual cast of characters in, and they had to make that media environment look, you know, a little bit more like what they were used to. And so they liked the Russian model. Um, the Russians said, Oh, no, no, no, we can help you. But there's a guy in LA who did it, you know, for us go see him. And so I got invited by the government and government agency to go to China. And again, for me, it was like, wow, this is a great adventure. Um, and, uh, so I went there and I did that, and they allowed us to start a, um, uh, an experimental media company there.

And, uh, so we're, we're still there. And we do, uh, well, you know, the pandemic has caused a whole bunch of problems, but we did TV shows. We do internet content. We do feature films. Uh, we actually have a consulting group in, uh, Beijing that helps Western companies come into the market and build their brand really at a very ground level, understanding of the way China works, uh, which is, you know, you may need accountants and you may need lawyers, but then again, you need practical entrepreneurs who know how to maneuver. Um, so we do that for some Western companies. Uh, we, um, you know, have done, we've had major shows on TV there, you know, and there is a little different sub besides bringing stuff there, like, uh, buying formats of American shows and redoing those in, in Mandarin language. So you take a show like gossip girl.

So, you know, instead of spoiled rich girls in New York and spoiled rich girls in Shanghai, you already had the basis for, you know, a hit show there. And, you know, it, the English version proved very popular to have why not the Chinese version. Um, but then we started creating original stuff specifically for the market. We had, uh, eight years of show called hello, Hollywood, uh, which was what is the Chinese audience want to know about what goes on in Hollywood about which very different than a U S audience. And, um, you know, that was, we're doing some, a lot of travel shows, Chinese, China's the largest group of outbound tourists in the world these days. Well, it wasn't until the pandemic anyway. Um, so, you know, a lot of countries are interested in attracting the Chinese to come. So we do some shows that, you know, we just, we're pretty shooting the Balkans and stuff like that, you know, where they want to bring Chinese stories there or did want to bring them before the pandemic. And, uh, so we just do it, you know, lots of, lots of stuff there. I mean, it's really varied. And, uh, and I, I spent, you know, about half my time on may 10 related business,

Paul Nicolini:

If you're watching or listening to this episode of the deal flow show, you can get access to our archives as well as subscribe and follow us to get access to future episodes by going to the deal flow show.com, Larry, you, uh, you're currently serving as a COO of fan Vester, which we want to hear all about, but you mentioned an artist before. One of my personal favorites, David Bowie, I had recently saw an interview. You did, what influence did the David Bowie brand or how he branded himself has to do with also fan Vester? Could you share that with us please?

Larry Namer:

I got involved with fan Vesta, which is kind of like it's an online platform where fans of any artists, whether they be accredited or nonaccredited investors could actually, you know, invest in securities or bonds, some kind of financial instrument that relates to their favorite artists, uh, could be within the field that the artist is, could be something the artist is passionate about. That's sort of a presumed musician. It doesn't necessarily have to be music. Uh, they may want to start a fashion line and stuff and want to invest money. But the Bowie thing I thought was very interesting and was a great opportunity to, because when I really researched that, you know, David, at some point realized that every dollar, if they came in on his related to his music, the record company was getting 87 cents and he was getting 13. Um, so he, his people, his management, people were very smart.

They created a financial instrument, gold Bowie bonds. And what they did was they from David's fans, they raised the money, um, and they bought back the library from the record company and they basically flipped the equation. So now every dollar that came in, went to David, you know, David's company of which his fans were invested. So they benefited greatly also. Um, and I started to think about that and they said, you know, especially now during the pandemic where, you know, what was a reasonably rigid industry, you know, when you go to people in the music business, they go, well, that's not the way we do it. Um, you know, that was six months ago. Um, now when I come in and say, I got a new idea, how you could make some money, you know, get some revenue, they are loosening.

JP Maroney:

That is, it has shuffled everything. So give us the, the, maybe a couple of project examples or something that would kind of give our audience an insight into the platform and how it works.

Larry Namer:

Sure. Um, so fan base that, you know, you have a lot of, you know, platforms like Kickstarter and those things, which basically you're not security or securitize things you use sign up and get a product. There only are a product of the discount itself, a fan dress to kind of runs the gamut. So number one, it's it, it has sec approvals for certain kinds of investment levels like reg CF levels or reggae's and stuff like that. So you could raise a reasonable amount of money from, from, from the public. And, um, so you could go either to the web app or the mobile app, uh, you know, sign up and you become a fan fan member. So you could invest in certain projects. And again, it could be a music star, his next album, you know, where they don't want to do it through the record company.

It could be their next tour where they don't want to sign up with live nation and, you know, do that kind of thing. Or it could be as simple as somebody wanting to start something a little bit outside of their core business. Uh, like, uh, I'm working now with a major league baseball player. Well, all of Famer, um, who wants to start a fragrance line, um, he's got a huge social media following fans love them. And, uh, you know, rather than they go to the traditional VC route, they're able to raise money, you know, a much more economic basis, uh, you know, through their fan base and the fans get to own it. Um, you know, in the sports world, I think they, the interesting model is we may package, um, people don't realize that the packets are actually owned by their fence. They issued a public stock and the fan zone it.

And, uh, they, um, you know, I don't think they've had an MTC in 50 years and the fans are interesting because they're not necessarily looking for huge ROIs. And though the way you may look at, you know, when you invest in Pepsi or Coke or something, but, um, yeah, they liked having that certificate on the wall and nobody likes to lose money, but they're not looking, you know, for crazy returns on it and stuff. They're, they, they love having that closeness with their, uh, with their team. And, you know, the team does special days for those shareholders and stuff like that, and deal works great. So we say, you know, there are, there are soccer teams out there that, you know, want to raise a bunch on, sell off a piece to raise money, to go buy a new store. And so just so many opportunities there, and that's kind of what got me jazz about fan best stuff.

JP Maroney:

So that I'm clear on it though. Are they, are they, are they investing in fan Vester or are they investing in the

Larry Namer:

Individual celebrity or sports figure? Fan dress skirt is just not a digital platform, which facilitates investments, but the investments themselves go into the individual projects. Canvas just takes a fee certainly much less than, you know, what a VC or anybody like that will take. Um, so it could be for investments like that. It could be for, um, raising money for a charity. Um, we just did a thing with the Jonas brothers where they wanted to raise money from their fans, uh, for COVID relief efforts. Um, fan blaster is great at that, you know, so we, uh, we, we put that up there and we raised money for it, you know, we're still going. And, um, you know, so that thing, we did some more Ryan Seacrest's, we're doing jumped on Paul Oak and field now. Um, so you know, it kinda, while there are companies that do little pieces of what fan vested does fan dress is really the first one that brings it all together. So we could do a security's raised that has, uh, uh, experiences involved that has a sweepstake or a contest or anything like that. All kind of, kind of in one package

JP Maroney:

Regulation, is that raising under then

Larry Namer:

We could do right. CF, uh, you know, Chris smaller raises up to 1,000,070 thousand. We can do reggaes. We could do reg DS. We could do, um, reg S okay. Very interesting.

JP Maroney:

Talk about, you've had some, obviously some great successes. I haven't met a single person over the years of building businesses myself that's ever had any success that also hasn't had what I call learning experiences. Others call them setbacks, failures, challenges, whatever they might be. I want to talk about that in just a moment, but before we do, if you're watching or listening to this episode of the deal flow show, you can get access to our archives, as well as following subscribe to get access to future episodes, by going to the deal flow show.com the deal flow show.com. So Larry namer here, obviously founder of E entertainment group, as well as now involved with fan vestors COO of that, and may ton entertainment group. So let's talk a little bit about the other side of success, and that is those times when everything doesn't go exactly right. Walk us through it's part mindset, it's part strategy, it's part having a process. How has it worked for you over the years when you hit the wall? How do you approach that? How do you get around it? How do you move forward?

Larry Namer:

Well, you know, I, you know, we go back to, uh, you know, and I got to say that I wake up every morning with 10 new ideas. Um, nine of them are usually by the end of the day, I realize how stupid they were. Um, I'm smart enough to throw them away and not focus on bad ideas just cause they were mine, but, you know, going back, um, uh, we were managing partners in an LLC and we own one of the greatest domain names in the world called television.com. Um, and somebody came along and offered us $7 million for the domain name. And we just said, no, no, no, no, we're not selling out. We're going to launch this on shelves. And it'll be a, you know, if broadcast.com was a billion, this is to, um, so we launched it. Um, and it was a huge success from the audience point of view.

We were one of the first people that really use streaming video and stuff like that. Although, you know, the streaming video wasn't as robust as it is today. Um, and without any marketing money, we were up to a million users a month. And this has gone back to the late nineties, early 2000, and then the, um, uh, the internet bust came and you had all these websites that, you know, everybody was selling video ads at $25 a thousand and know that our economics are great. But then when everybody started dumping their inventory into the marketplace, the ed cost went down to 25 cents a thousand. Well, we couldn't afford to feed someone in, you know, a video and at those kinds of rates. So the more people that use the service and the bigger we grew, the more we would lose. And, you know, we begged zoo a Google to delist us, please don't tell anybody we exist.

We don't want anybody coming here anymore. And you know, of course they wouldn't do that. And it was just one of those things that no matter what we did, um, this thing kept growing and the more it kept growing, the more money we would lose, uh, until eventually we just shut it down and realized that, you know, sometimes the world takes over and doesn't make a difference how smart you think you are. So that's kind of been one of, for me, it was a great lesson because I really learn, you know, that sometimes you got to put your ego aside and go, you know what? It seemed like a good idea back then, but Andy just constantly reassess the things you're doing and, you know, have the nerve to go, you know what I thought it was good. Wasn't next, you know, and instead of trying to focus on saving it, get rid of it quick and focus on the things that actually can make money.

Paul Nicolini:

What's your pregame, what's your, how do you, how do you get yourself ready for a deal? And also with that, what are some of the deal breakers that you've come across? And what is some of the red flags? So kind of a two part question. How do you prepare and then what, what do you do when you see those red flags?

Larry Namer:

Well, I mean, you know, lots of research, um, I read late into the night. So literally before you go into a meeting with anybody, I researched the heck out of it, stuff like that. And I try to know as much about their businesses. They might, uh, not possible of course, but, uh, I want to make sure I have a good understanding of what all the underlying dynamics are in that deal. Um, and you know, so having that really coming up with, what do you think a fair deal is going to be a good time? I'm a great believer that if both sides don't come out with something good, the deal may get done, but it's going to die on the vine. Um, eventually the other person will realize it's a one sided deal and they're gonna find a way to, uh, to get ready to get out of it.

Um, so, you know, coming up with something that I think will work for both sides, but the, uh, the deal breakers typically, you know, when, when somebody proposes something to me that I recognize is one sided, a lot of people want to, they want to build their business based on someone else's reputation and successes. So he just wanted to be near you so they can announce. And now I'm in business with Larranae my, the founder would be, and, you know, stuff like that. And then, you know, a month later there's really nothing there, but they got their press announcement now. So, you know, I look for that and do it. That's the thing that turns me off is when people right off the bat answer exclusive, they go, okay, we'll do that deal, but we want to be your exclusive, whatever. Um, you know, to me, exclusivity is something you need to earn. You don't get it at the beginning of a deal.

Paul Nicolini:

What excites you now? What keeps you going? Like, are there, is it goals you haven't achieved or is it projects that you go, man, this is just a cool idea. And I want to be a part of it. What is it that gets you up in the morning and keeps you excited? It's going through those 10 that he thought about, right?

Larry Namer:

Yeah. I love doing new stuff. I love things that actually give me the opportunity to learn and grow. Um, for me, I, you know, I got involved in fan vestors and adviser, um, uh, cause I thought it was fascinating and it took, you know, kind of my understanding of the media and entertainment business. And then what was really taking me into the world of finance, um, you know, on a much deeper level than I've ever had to be involved. And um, so, you know, that was it, it was, it was learning. Uh, and so couple that, with things that I think are exciting, I think there are new opportunities. I, I always look for kind of, you know, the silver lining in every cloud, um, even with the pandemic, um, you know, it's, it's horrible, you know, it continues to be horrible, but I think there's some incredible business opportunities that arise from, from this that maybe weren't there before.

Um, like I said, when you, when I deal with people, particularly in music or film or whatever, um, I could propose something new to them six months ago and they go, ah, that's not the way we do it. Uh, now everybody's going help us out. We needed a new way. We needed a new path. So those things are frightened for me. That's what I like doing. I like doing a lot of stuff that revolves evolves. I've been doing diversity way before diversity became a cool thing. I mean, my whole history in the cable business is about, you know, letting smaller voices, you know, participate in media, democratizing media in many ways. And, uh, yeah, so those are the, those are the things I hate. I tried golf, I hated it. Um, and I said, you know, if I don't keep finding new things to do, you know, I might be forced to play this game and I just don't want to do that.

JP Maroney:

Good answer. Good answer. Are there any types of people, obviously Harbor city and the deal flow show team, we've built a network ourselves prior to the show, but through this show, now we're approaching 30 episodes for season one that's launching in this fourth quarter of this year. So are there any kind of people that you would like to connect with or what is it that is the things that are on your horizon? What kind of people or deals would you like to be approached with?

Larry Namer:

Well, I, you know, I, I'm pretty focused on fan Vesta related business these days. And, um, you know, anybody who has, um, reasonable size social media presence, God's fan base was really based on, you know, people who are looking to raise money, having a very active social media presence and stuff. So whether it's a CF, a small raise, you know, have a million dollars, um, or, you know, a reggae, uh, if the fan base is there or access to a fan base, is there, um, those are people that would be real interesting for me to be needing

JP Maroney:

Incidentally do y'all cross promote. So in other words, do you take other other celebrities that have raised or done projects on fan Vester and cross promote your new projects?

Larry Namer:

Yeah. Well, we do that in, as a matter of fact, we just started and again, I'm only a month in, so, you know, uh, you know, to an active role from when I was just an advisor, um, we're also doing another thing of taking, uh, more or less startup companies or early stage companies that are looking for brand ambassadors. On the other hand, we've got, you know, particularly a lot of sports celebrities and stuff that are not working the way they used to that. And we're becoming a marriage broker in that sense. And again, that stuff is fun, figuring out who really makes sense that, you know, represent certain types of businesses,

JP Maroney:

Love that we're going to be in touch with you about that when we get offline. Cause we've got some, in fact there was one other guests, several people, but one of the guests that we had on the show that has a, an audience or a portfolio of people that are a perfect match for this, I'm very excited about the model that we've talked a lot about reggae, a little bit about CF, but a lot about reggae on this show. And in fact intend to do a special round table talking about reggae. And I think you offer a really unique perspective on that. I'd like to invite you to potentially come back for that round table and be a part of that. As we bring several people in to talk about the reggae, I think that's one of the most exciting opportunities that certainly a democratized capital raising in a way, and, and taking a lot of the power away from the good old boys network. So it's gonna be really interesting to see where that goes over the next few years.

Larry Namer:

Yeah. That's, you know, the, the, one of the fun things about fan vestors, it really doesn't see color or religion or gender or anything like that. It's, if you've got fans, those are making a difference who you are, what they are and stuff. Um, it's an online platform that pulls it all together.

JP Maroney:

Have you primarily worked with, uh, let's say name people are, y'all now working with some of the social media influencers. They didn't have a name outside of social media, but they blew up on YouTube or tick tock or something of that nature.

Larry Namer:

Yeah, both. I mean, it really comes down to how much of a social media influence people have. So they could be, you know, a Sully could be a rock kind of celebrity on one hand, or it could just be, you know, somebody who's an engineer only employed as long as they've got a reasonable sized space and they're willing to be active in promoting the project and the fundraising that, that matches up well to what fan best they can do best.

JP Maroney:

All right. Other than the fact that you don't like golf, is there anything, is there anything that our audience are the people listening to this wouldn't know about Larry? Is there something that you could share?

Larry Namer:

I'm an avid avid chef. I read a cookbook a month. I practice in the kitchen. It's kind of my, um, psychological release. Whenever I have a difficult day, I go in the kitchen, I cook and I kind of forget about everything. So rather than go to the psychiatrist, I go to the kitchen.

JP Maroney:

Interesting. Wait, hang on. Where's our invites, right? Well, I'm going to invite myself because I want to work on it. We're working on a show where I'm going to be having breakfast with interesting people. And if you're game for it, we'll make it a date and you can cook breakfast. And then we'll talk about some other things. Business and success

Larry Namer:

Works for me. I love cooking for other people.

JP Maroney:

Awesome. Sounds good, Larry. Um, what is the best way for somebody to get ahold of you or to reach out? Is it through a website, an email? What would be the best way for you?

Larry Namer:

LJN and LJN media.com you know, which is my kind of holding company, uh, uh, you know, I'm on Facebook, I'm on Instagram, I'm on all those, you know, like I do, but I do Facebook myself. Um, but you know, the Twitters and the other stuff that somebody from the office tends to be quite honest.

JP Maroney:

Absolutely fantastic. Larry, I appreciate you being on the show. Yeah. We're going to be back in touch when I know we have some connections that are gonna, that are gonna make sense. So it was great to have you on and share your special perspective on what we're doing at the deal table. Uh, once again, if you're listening or watching this episode of the deal flow show, you can get access to our episodes future and past by going to the deal flow show.com on behalf of myself, Paul, Nick, and Leni, my coast here at the deal flow show. I'm JP Maroney and we'll see you again on another episode very, very soon. Take care, everybody. Thanks again, Larry.

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